(Source: lvciferr, via oosik)

museum-of-artifacts:

Tebarantauti, porcupine fish helmet from Kiribati, 19th century. The British Museum. The Gilbertese (the people of the Gilbert Islands) used the porcupine fish to make head dresses for warriors.

museum-of-artifacts:

Tebarantauti, porcupine fish helmet from Kiribati, 19th century. The British Museum. The Gilbertese (the people of the Gilbert Islands) used the porcupine fish to make head dresses for warriors.

(via vakkomondor)

munchies:

Red Gold

Around one quarter to one third of Cuban food imports currently come from the USA, including beef— but it’s as scarce as soap, pens, and smartphones. Whatever meat they are buying from the US, it seems, is being purchased without being inspected.

shyandtired-eyed:

thekhooll:

Off to School We Go

"The story might sound incredible to some, but it isn’t uncommon for children from less privileged regions facing immense hardship on their commute to the institute of learning. You will be surprised at the great lengths some children are willing to go to reach school." via

This is heartbreaking

(Source: archatlas, via ancient-anthropoids)

solaceames:

binghsien:

note-a-bear:

kaalashnikov:

cracked:

Dark Ages, Schmark Ages. The De-Textbook cuts through that and so much more fake-fact bullshit.

cloudy with a chance of witch burning

your periodic reminder that a good chunk of Europe basically shat the bed for a few centuries while everyone else kinda did their thing.

I am sorry I’m going to be that person.
This map is extremely inaccurate.
1) China was not going through business as usual China was going through the TANG DYNASTY i.e. the Golden Age of Chinese culture, which would lay down legal and social and poetic norms for the rest of Chinese history. The Tang is so influential that a lot of languages call Chinese people 唐人 (People from Tang.) (We call Chinese people “people from Qin” so.)
2) Japan is _first becoming literate_ during this time period (due to the influence of the Tang they adopt Chinese script), which is a BFD for poetry, religion, politics, society. Japanese court culture develops, which near the end of this period (11th century, around the time Europe enters “high middle ages”) will produce The Tale of Genji (by a totally awesome woman named Murasaki),widely regarded as the world’s first novel because of it’s deft use of irony and social commentary.
3) The southern part of Korea is experiencing the emergence of Unified Silla, a state that will last the entire period and will see the importation of Chinese and Indian buddhism, the construction of the first Confucian college in Korea, and so on.
4) In Mesoamerica, the Mayans are inventing astronomy, writing (the third and final independent invention of writing in human history), and a whole crapload of other stuff. This is the triumph of their culture.
5) The Umayyads in Spain are a massive center of technology, learning, and (comparative) religious toleration.
6) The Eastern Roman Empire, which spans both the green and yellow portions of your map, isn’t doing too badly either, bouncing back after losing territory to the Caliphate.
7) The Polynesians are colonizing the ENTIRE PACIFIC using amazing advanced navigation technology not rivaled until the INVENTION OF GPS.
8) I am not equipped to talk about Sub-Saharan Africa in detail (cue rant about how we never learn about subsaharan africa in the western educational system) but you can bet there are some major, amazing developments going on there too. I’d be shocked if there weren’t.
9) HOLY SHIT INDIA.
10) OMG SOUTH EAST ASIA. SOUTH. EAST. ASIA.
11) THEY WEREN’T BURNING WITCHES IN EUROPE DURING THE MIGRATION PERIOD (dark ages). Witch burning took off in the EARLY MODERN PERIOD, nearly 1000 years after this. Europe was going through some tough shit, which would leave them backwards compared to the rest of the world for 1000 years, but also there were some amazing things happening there, at least have the decency to be like “angry dudes with swords stabbing people” not WITCH BURNINGS FFS.
12) And ABSOLUTELY Islamic Caliphate was a totally amazing flowering of intellectual, artistic, and spiritual culture, a mixing pot between a thousand cultures and languages, and totally amazing. Don’t in any way want to diminish that in any way.

I’ve always winced when seeing the original picture, so thank you binghsien for that excellent commentary!
To add:
8) Around 1000 AD was a major wave of Bantu migration, carrying a new technology of advanced ironwork throughout Africa:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/2chapter4.shtml

solaceames:

binghsien:

note-a-bear:

kaalashnikov:

cracked:

Dark Ages, Schmark Ages. The De-Textbook cuts through that and so much more fake-fact bullshit.

cloudy with a chance of witch burning

your periodic reminder that a good chunk of Europe basically shat the bed for a few centuries while everyone else kinda did their thing.

I am sorry I’m going to be that person.

This map is extremely inaccurate.

1) China was not going through business as usual China was going through the TANG DYNASTY i.e. the Golden Age of Chinese culture, which would lay down legal and social and poetic norms for the rest of Chinese history. The Tang is so influential that a lot of languages call Chinese people 唐人 (People from Tang.) (We call Chinese people “people from Qin” so.)

2) Japan is _first becoming literate_ during this time period (due to the influence of the Tang they adopt Chinese script), which is a BFD for poetry, religion, politics, society. Japanese court culture develops, which near the end of this period (11th century, around the time Europe enters “high middle ages”) will produce The Tale of Genji (by a totally awesome woman named Murasaki),widely regarded as the world’s first novel because of it’s deft use of irony and social commentary.

3) The southern part of Korea is experiencing the emergence of Unified Silla, a state that will last the entire period and will see the importation of Chinese and Indian buddhism, the construction of the first Confucian college in Korea, and so on.

4) In Mesoamerica, the Mayans are inventing astronomy, writing (the third and final independent invention of writing in human history), and a whole crapload of other stuff. This is the triumph of their culture.

5) The Umayyads in Spain are a massive center of technology, learning, and (comparative) religious toleration.

6) The Eastern Roman Empire, which spans both the green and yellow portions of your map, isn’t doing too badly either, bouncing back after losing territory to the Caliphate.

7) The Polynesians are colonizing the ENTIRE PACIFIC using amazing advanced navigation technology not rivaled until the INVENTION OF GPS.

8) I am not equipped to talk about Sub-Saharan Africa in detail (cue rant about how we never learn about subsaharan africa in the western educational system) but you can bet there are some major, amazing developments going on there too. I’d be shocked if there weren’t.

9) HOLY SHIT INDIA.

10) OMG SOUTH EAST ASIA. SOUTH. EAST. ASIA.

11) THEY WEREN’T BURNING WITCHES IN EUROPE DURING THE MIGRATION PERIOD (dark ages). Witch burning took off in the EARLY MODERN PERIOD, nearly 1000 years after this. Europe was going through some tough shit, which would leave them backwards compared to the rest of the world for 1000 years, but also there were some amazing things happening there, at least have the decency to be like “angry dudes with swords stabbing people” not WITCH BURNINGS FFS.

12) And ABSOLUTELY Islamic Caliphate was a totally amazing flowering of intellectual, artistic, and spiritual culture, a mixing pot between a thousand cultures and languages, and totally amazing. Don’t in any way want to diminish that in any way.

I’ve always winced when seeing the original picture, so thank you binghsien for that excellent commentary!

To add:

8) Around 1000 AD was a major wave of Bantu migration, carrying a new technology of advanced ironwork throughout Africa:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/africa/features/storyofafrica/2chapter4.shtml

(via anthrocentric)

museum-of-artifacts:

Jade Burial Suit, 4248 Jade Pieces Connected by Gold Wire (Western Han, 206 BCE - 8 CE)

museum-of-artifacts:

Jade Burial Suit, 4248 Jade Pieces Connected by Gold Wire (Western Han, 206 BCE - 8 CE)

(via vakkomondor)

museum-of-artifacts:

Mountaineers’ ice axe used by NKVD agent Ramón Mercader to kill Trotsky after he defected to the West. Rust has formed where Trotsky’s blood remained on the instrument.

museum-of-artifacts:

Mountaineers’ ice axe used by NKVD agent Ramón Mercader to kill Trotsky after he defected to the West. Rust has formed where Trotsky’s blood remained on the instrument.

(via vakkomondor)

museum-of-artifacts:

The service weapon of J R R Tolkien, who served on the Somme before contracting trench fever in October 1916

museum-of-artifacts:

The service weapon of J R R Tolkien, who served on the Somme before contracting trench fever in October 1916

(via vakkomondor)

(via sexyseacow)

thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 
This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.
Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Those legs…

thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 

This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.

Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Those legs…

tryingtohandlemylife:

This is someone dying while having an MRI scan. Before you die, your brain releases tons and tons of endorphins that make you feel a range of emotions. Tragically beautiful.

tryingtohandlemylife:

This is someone dying while having an MRI scan. Before you die, your brain releases tons and tons of endorphins that make you feel a range of emotions. Tragically beautiful.

(via hamegfordulaszelbeverzikatudonk)

museum-of-artifacts:

Graeco-Roman curse effigy (“voodoo doll”), pierced by 13 needles. Egypt, 2nd cent CE

museum-of-artifacts:

Graeco-Roman curse effigy (“voodoo doll”), pierced by 13 needles. Egypt, 2nd cent CE

(via vakkomondor)

Substantia spongiosa of bone under microscope under shitty mobile phone camera.

Substantia spongiosa of bone under microscope under shitty mobile phone camera.

What It’s Like to Carry Your Nobel Prize through Airport Security →

buffoonery:

“They’re like, ‘Sir, there’s something in your bag.’
I said, ‘Yes, I think it’s this box.’
They said, ‘What’s in the box?’
I said, ‘a large gold medal,’ as one does.
So they opened it up and they said, ‘What’s it made out of?’
I said, ‘gold.’
And they’re like, ‘Uhhhh. Who gave this to you?’
‘The King of Sweden.’
‘Why did he give this to you?’
‘Because I helped discover the expansion rate of the universe was accelerating.’

(via ancient-anthropoids)

Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes →

museumably:

(via anthrocentric)

Kreon by Stijn.